The Internationalization of Language: Another InterNet Effect

One of the more profound effects of the internet on the world, and world history, an effect which Silverwolf things has not been noted with due importance, is what he would call the “internationalization of language”. This occurs when people of differing cultures and languages are forced, or rather, are forced by the force of their own personal choice, to learn the languages of others, usually for motives of profit or romance. With virtually instant translators, and translating pages, making the ancient art of live translation one reserved only for tour guides, and the Socialists and Racists of the UN, the necessity for spending several tedious hours with a foreign dictionary to decipher a missive has been snipped off with bypass loppers.

Perhaps the greatest aid to this spreading of the knowledge of foreign languages has been the posting of film clips on the net in foreign languages with subtitled translations. This excellent method of absorbing foreign languages is well illustrated by a film such as “Dersu Uzala” by Kurosawa, in which an ethnic Goldi, with strong Asian features, who speaks a very primitive Russian, meets a Russian team of surveyors in the wilderness. Though he knew perhaps 10 words in Russian beforehand, by the end of the film, Silverwolf had probably learned an equal amount of new words, as he heard Dersu use the same limited vocabulary, over and over, to convey his “primitive” ideas to the Russkies. As we Silverwolves say to guests traveling through the forest, “Moy dom, doy dom” (my house is your house).

Perhaps another force driving the learning of the international languages comes from reading the comments written in chat columns by humans under 20. One can quickly gain the “in” words and phrases used in current parlance through this procedure, though of course not until one has a primitive but broad comprehension of the language. A beginner could not do this, but a second term student could.

Of course, this phenomenon was started years ago, in Europe, when books began to be published showing the titles of photos or art exhibits in the four main Euro languages simultaneously. It’s easy to see why so many Europeans were fluent in several languages, a process which Silverwolf thinks has a very beneficent effect on the brain, forcing it to memorize, retain, compare, and instantly translate. This process had been completely absent in America, where students struggle for years to learn a foreign language that they may read, but will rarely speak, and so will tend to forget. However, the massive influx of Latinos into the Southwest has brought about a similar simultaneous translation of signs, instructions, tax forms, etc. which, through osmosis, has slightly exposed the Anglo-Euro culture in America to Spanish, while Spanish-speaking students, in Silverwolf’s opinion, have a great advantage over the Anglos since it is their brains which will benefit from the necessity to develop two sets of language to communicate in.

Silverwolf thinks it may well be that this “internationalization” of language will lead to new ways of expressing the thoughts that seem to run through the heads of those Human Beings we Wolves are forced to share our earth with, an Earth which the Big Guy Upstairs clearly meant should belong to us Wolves alone. In fact, Silverwolf thinks that in one- to three-thousand years from now, our language will be as unintelligible to future speakers as Beowulf is now unintelligible to modern American high school students. Words will be pilfered from every language, first here, first there, according to men’s tastes, and the composite gallimaufry stew of the international language will have all the flavours of Mankind.

And so, Silverwolf can envision a future, several thousand years from now, where someone might send a postcard written in “Earthlish” (or email by thought-projection by then?) to a friend, while on their summer vacation, that might run something like this:

“Dear Hans,

Ich wanted de ecrire a usted wegen los jeunes filles yo ha deckoed promenading aroom la place de la Concorde. Sono a bunch buenos kvinner la, blondines, rothpellos, schwarzhairs, et otras pretty flickas. Nemmen dein pick.  Ha redden con ein, and she ma dite “Flake off, dork.” Pero, el segundo me sprachen tres jolie, and nosotros “made nice”.

Si usted is ever a Paris, io recommendare a usted go therein, et check out the local talent. Molti molti foxy madchen la, encircare el statue de il molto famoso Libertarian of il 21st Century, Senator Lobo Silverwolf, el Senator desde the State de Nevada, il y a 2000 years ago. Cette statue famoso, rests sur ein plynth inscribe mit los argots qui form Silverwolf’s well-known motto , “Liberty, Equality, Frugality”.

Dein amico,                   Werewolf.”

Undoubtedly, men will talk like this in the far future.

Es certo. Silverwolf lo speculare!

Hooooooooooooooooowwwwwwwwwwwwww! — Silverwolf

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4 Responses to “The Internationalization of Language: Another InterNet Effect”

  1. Delta Says:

    You are insane. I love you.

    • lobobreed Says:

      Delta — Well, not certifiably insane, even though I’ve tried for years to get documentation to try to establish the fact. They say my blogs make too much sense, and I’m obviously sane. Too bad. — Silverwolf.

  2. Die Internationalisierung der Sprache: einen anderen Internet-Effekt Says:

    […] Einer der tiefgreifenden Auswirkungen des Internets auf der Welt und der Weltgeschichte, ein Effekt, der die Dinge nicht mit Silverwolf gebührende Bedeutung wurde festgestellt, ist das, was er die "Internationalisierung der Sprache nennen." Dies geschieht, wenn Menschen unterschiedlicher Kulturen und Sprachen gezwungen sind, oder vielmehr gezwungen sind, durch die Kraft der [. . . ] URL des Original-Artikel https://lobobreed.wordpress.com/2010/04/06/the-internationalization-of-language-another-internet-effe… […]

  3. La internacionalización del lenguaje: otro efecto Internet Says:

    […] Uno de los efectos más profundos de la Internet en el mundo, y la historia del mundo, un efecto que las cosas Silverwolf no se ha observado con la debida importancia, es lo que llamaríamos la "internacionalización del lenguaje". Esto ocurre cuando la gente de diferentes culturas y lenguas se ven obligados, o más bien, se ven obligados por la fuerza de [. . . ] URL del artículo original https://lobobreed.wordpress.com/2010/04/06/the-internationalization-of-language-another-internet-effe… […]

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